Description

Welcome to the Space Biology Network!

This network is an interactive place to read and discuss the latest research on space biology (as it pertains to plants), to compile relevant resources and links to databases surrounding space biology, and to facilitate dialogue between members about the aspects of the field that motivate and excite each other.

This network will be divided into distinct content categories, though it is understood that much of the content would be appropriate in multiple categories.

Collections:

Off the Earth, for the Earth
A term used to describe research done in space and/or low Earth orbit in which the research outcomes have direct application to improving life on Earth.

Controlled Environmental Agriculture
Encompasses a broad interest area, but this page focuses on research and application of controlled environments on space vehicles and non-Earth environments (the Moon, Mars, etc…).

Developmental and Molecular Biology
Contains published research, as well as ongoing projects and research done in microgravity or simulated microgravity that enriches our fundamental understanding of plant developmental and molecular processes.

Space Biology Technology and Resources
A variety of unique devices and experimental set ups that can be used to answer questions within space biology.


Apollo 11 50th Anniversary

The launch of Apollo 11 on July 16th, 1969 and the subsequent moon landing on July 20th was a significant milestone for the world. It demonstrated the collective ability of people to achieve a goal previously confined to dreams or works of fiction. This event continues to be an inspiration for people around the globe and spurs interest in science and engineering. While there were no plants flown on the Apollo 11 mission, botanical specimens have a long history in spaceflight. Events such as the Apollo 11 mission paved the way for future generations to carry out ground-breaking research that informs us about plant development and response to the external environment without the omnipresent effect of Earth’s 1g.  

Please enjoy the responses of investigators within the field to the following questions about this incredible milestone. Feel free to reach out to the respondents with further questions or comments, and I encourage you to submit your own responses in the comments section below or, if you’d like your responses to be highlighted on Plantae, send them to njm76@cornell.edu with your name and any other information about yourself you’d like to have included with the post (Twitter handle, head shot, etc…).

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