In November 2018, a workshop and symposium on the topic of plant science outreach was organized by the North American Arabidopsis Steering Committee (NAASC) and held at the University of California, Davis. The symposium, open to the public, featured a series of speakers who shared their perspective and experiences on the topic of Using Plants to Broaden the Impact of Science in Society.

The talks were recorded and are posted below.

Seeds Of Change: Using Plants to Broaden the Impact of Science in Society Symposium hosted at UC Davis, 2018 11 07


  1. Jose Dinneny, Stanford University: Innovative, Inclusive, and Integrative Plant Science Outreach 
  2. Mary Wildermuth, University of California, Berkeley: Developing the next generation of diverse scientists: Be A Scientist program as a model for University-public school partnerships 
  3. Rick Amasino, University of Wisconsin, Madison: Rapid-cycling Brassica rapa as an educational model plant 
  4. Ying Sun, Stanford University: Let the real you shine: programs to enhance diversity and inclusion in graduate education 
  5. Alexandra Schnoes, iBiology: Democratizing science education 
  6. Roger Hangarter, Indiana University: Improving Science Literacy Through Art 
  7. Liz Haswell, Washington University in St. Louis: Podcasting for community-building and community-broadening 

The presentations are collectively posted at: https://www.araport.org/community/group/naasc

And individually at the NAASC YouTube Channel  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0a5NlGdsj8CgW5_696hX7w






- The accompanying 2-day workshop, “Broadening the Impact of Plant Science Through Community-Based Innovation, Evaluation and Sharing of Outreach Programs” was supported by NSF* Award #1518280 to PI Siobhan Brady/Co-PI Joanna Friesner

*The material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. #1518280. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this event, or in resulting work, are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.